Spring 2014 Semester Courses

CLSS, HIST 022-10 Roman History, CRN 10472 (4 credits) (SS)
T, TR, 7:55 a.m. - 9:10 a.m.
Rome from its origins to A.D. 476. Political, social and religious developments. Transformation of the late Roman Empire to the early medieval period.
Professor Phillips

CLSS 050-10 Mythology, CRN 18899 (4 credits) (HU)
M, W, 12:45 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Introduction to the study of the Greco-Roman myths in their social, political, and historical contexts. Equal emphasis on learning the myths and strategies for interpreting them as important evidence for studying classical antiquity. 
Professor Pavlock

CLSS, ANTH 112-10 Doing Archaeology, CRN 15880 (4 credits) (SS)
M, W, F, 3:10 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Principles of archaeological method and theory. Excavation and survey methods, artifact analysis, dating techniques, and cultural reconstruction. Course includes field project. Professor Small

CLSS, REL 114-10 Christian Origins: New Testament and the Beginnings of, CRN 18623 (4 credits) (HU)
T, TR, 9:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Early Christianity from its beginnings until the end of the second century. Coverage includes the Jewish and Hellenistic matrices of Christianity, traditions about the life of Jesus and his significance, and the variety of belief and practice of early Christians. Emphasis on encountering primary texts. 
Professor Wright

CLSS, HIST 161-10 Roman Law, CRN 18544 (4 credits) (SS)
T, TR, 9:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
Examination of Roman legal systems from the Twelve Tables to the Digest of Justinian. Emphasis on development of legal concepts and their historical context. Readings in primary sources; lectures; discussion. 
Professor Phillips

CLSS, PHIL 232-10 Figures/Themes in Hellenistic Philosophy, CRN 18575 (4 credits) (HU)
T, TR, 9:20 a.m. - 10:35 a.m.
This seminar will involve an in-depth focus upon a major movement in Hellenistic philosophy (roughly 4th century B.C.E. to the second century C.E.), such as Epicureanism, Stoicism, ancient skepticism, or Neoplatonism, or the Hellenistic treatment of a particular theme (e.g., freedom from anxiety, the nature of the cosmos and our place within it, or human nature). Content varies. May be repeated more than once for credit. Prerequisite: One HU designated course in Philosophy.  
Professor Mendelson

LAT 002-10 Elementary Latin II, CRN 10740 (4 credits) (HU)
M, W, 10:35 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Continuation of grammar, easy Latin prose and poetry. Students should have completed one semester of elementary Latin or the equivalent. 
Professor Pavlock

LAT 012-10 Intermediate Latin, CRN 13722 (4 credits) (HU)
M, W, 2:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Readings in Latin prose or poetry. Consolidation of reading ability; introduction to literary analysis. Students should have completed two semesters of elementary Latin or the equivalent. 
Professor Pavlock

LAT 111-10 Catullus and Horace, CRN 16382 (4 credits) (HU)
M, W, 2:10 p.m. - 3:25 p.m.
Translation and analysis of selected lyrics, focusing on imagery systems. Introduction to metrics. May be repeated for credit. Students should have completed four semesters of Latin or the equivalent. 
Professor Pavlock